1. got no time to talk, i’m a dead girl walking!

    (Source: lyricbaritoneofrighteousness)

     
  2. 16:50

    Notes: 131085

    Reblogged from scarletxmoon

    Tags: yessssssssssplease

    faramihr:

    This is a PSA to ANY of my followers.

    YOU CAN TAG ME IN STUFF.

    YOU’RE NOT ANNOYING ME.

    SEEING STUFF IN MY TAG.

    MAKES MY DAY.

    LIKE SERIOUSLY.

    YOU THOUGHT OF ME. 

    YOU INCLUDED ME IN YOUR POST.

    YOU WANTED ME TO SEE SOMETHING.

    BLESS YOUR SWEET SOUL.

    BLESS.

    YOUR.

    SOUL.

     
  3. wizzard890:

xshruglife:



“Everything in the world is about sex except sex. Sex is about power.”  Oscar Wilde


Forever reblog

This gif’s widespread use as shorthand for the concept of ~weaponized femininity~ has always bothered me, and I’ve never understood why it’s become so popular. I mean, sure, at first brush, it seems obvious: here is a studiedly beautiful woman who, with the simple gesture of placing a cigarette between her lips, has dozens of men wrapped around her finger, vying for her favor. But just take a minute here and look at her face. She’s not reveling in this, you get the feeling that she didn’t even expect it, this woman is upset and overwhelmed by the amount of male attention she’s getting.
Because this is a pivotal moment in a movie about a woman who is forced into prostitution.
Giuseppe Tornatore’s Malena came out in 2000, and starred Monica Bellucci as the titular Malena, a young wife whose husband is off fighting for the Axis Powers in WWII. Beautiful and shy, Malena tries to keep to herself, but finds it increasingly difficult as word of her husband’s absence attracts not only the attention of all the men in town, but the bitter jealousy of their wives and lovers. She does nothing to encourage any of her suitors, and instead spends her days caring for her aging father. But this uneasy peace in her life is shattered when she receives word of her husband’s death, and she’s left to fend for herself in a town where half the people only care for her body, and the other half hate her for it.
In the rest of the film we see the following: Malena’s relationship with her father destroyed as a result of sexual slander, Malena taken to court by a jealous neighbor who swears the young woman was sleeping with her husband, Malena’s rape by her lawyer as “payment” for her legal fees, Malena’s entry into the world of prostitution, and Melena’s public beating, stripping, and humiliation at the hands of the town’s women when the Americans arrive at the end of the war. Her husband appears in the third act, somehow alive, and he reclaims his wife, restoring her to respectability, and the townspeople begin to accept her once more, now that she is on the arm of her husband, and has, as some of the women whisper, ‘put on a little weight”. 
But in spite of all of that, the film isn’t Malena’s story. Instead, we see her life through the eyes of our narrator, a young boy who by turns worships her and is disgusted by her “fall”. This is his coming of age, his discovery of himself through Malena’s trauma and the specter of female sexual jealousy.
In short, this is not a woman’s movie. Malena’s beauty is a cage, something that draws awful, selfish responses from the men around her, responses that she is forced to endure as a result of her situation. And what’s worse, her looks isolate her from women, none of whom can see past her smoky eyes and hourglass figure to the heartbroken widow who needs a friend.
So you know. Use gifs if you like, weaponize that femininity in the most numbskulled, reductively simple way possible, because lipstick is ~how you control men~ and Sex Is About Power, like Oscar Wilde said. Just remember that in this film, and so tragically often in real life, that power doesn’t rest in women’s hands. 

    wizzard890:

    xshruglife:


    “Everything in the world is about sex except sex. Sex is about power.”  Oscar Wilde

    Forever reblog

    This gif’s widespread use as shorthand for the concept of ~weaponized femininity~ has always bothered me, and I’ve never understood why it’s become so popular. I mean, sure, at first brush, it seems obvious: here is a studiedly beautiful woman who, with the simple gesture of placing a cigarette between her lips, has dozens of men wrapped around her finger, vying for her favor. But just take a minute here and look at her face. She’s not reveling in this, you get the feeling that she didn’t even expect it, this woman is upset and overwhelmed by the amount of male attention she’s getting.

    Because this is a pivotal moment in a movie about a woman who is forced into prostitution.

    Giuseppe Tornatore’s Malena came out in 2000, and starred Monica Bellucci as the titular Malena, a young wife whose husband is off fighting for the Axis Powers in WWII. Beautiful and shy, Malena tries to keep to herself, but finds it increasingly difficult as word of her husband’s absence attracts not only the attention of all the men in town, but the bitter jealousy of their wives and lovers. She does nothing to encourage any of her suitors, and instead spends her days caring for her aging father. But this uneasy peace in her life is shattered when she receives word of her husband’s death, and she’s left to fend for herself in a town where half the people only care for her body, and the other half hate her for it.

    In the rest of the film we see the following: Malena’s relationship with her father destroyed as a result of sexual slander, Malena taken to court by a jealous neighbor who swears the young woman was sleeping with her husband, Malena’s rape by her lawyer as “payment” for her legal fees, Malena’s entry into the world of prostitution, and Melena’s public beating, stripping, and humiliation at the hands of the town’s women when the Americans arrive at the end of the war. Her husband appears in the third act, somehow alive, and he reclaims his wife, restoring her to respectability, and the townspeople begin to accept her once more, now that she is on the arm of her husband, and has, as some of the women whisper, ‘put on a little weight”. 

    But in spite of all of that, the film isn’t Malena’s story. Instead, we see her life through the eyes of our narrator, a young boy who by turns worships her and is disgusted by her “fall”. This is his coming of age, his discovery of himself through Malena’s trauma and the specter of female sexual jealousy.

    In short, this is not a woman’s movie. Malena’s beauty is a cage, something that draws awful, selfish responses from the men around her, responses that she is forced to endure as a result of her situation. And what’s worse, her looks isolate her from women, none of whom can see past her smoky eyes and hourglass figure to the heartbroken widow who needs a friend.

    So you know. Use gifs if you like, weaponize that femininity in the most numbskulled, reductively simple way possible, because lipstick is ~how you control men~ and Sex Is About Power, like Oscar Wilde said. Just remember that in this film, and so tragically often in real life, that power doesn’t rest in women’s hands. 

    (Source: defpro)

     
  4. 11:15 19th Sep 2014

    Notes: 253478

    Reblogged from officialwhitegirls

    Tags: my roommate and I

    (Source: mrbenwyatt)

     
  5. thecrow-thecorpse:

    zygoats:

    im literally always looking at my reflection not because im conceited but because i just think it feels kind strange to have a physical form and im constantly trying to process who and what i am

    This. Someone put into words.

     
  6. When I walk into a church, I only see paintings of white angels. Why?- Eartha Kitt 

     
  7. daa-ze:

    skr0ala:

    dominicsellie:

    crrocs:

    people who complain about “getting too many asks”

    image

    people who get straight A’s and every test they say “im so gonna fail”image

    People who say their art sucks when its clearly amazing

    image

    Having a student who just can’t pass his fucking driver’s test

    image

     
  8. musicals-are-punk-rock:

    tell me which musical theatre character i remind you of (looks and/personality)

     
  9. 
So watch your back, I’m a dead girl walking.
Skulls will crack, I’m a dead girl walking.
It’s time to make amends and avenge my worthless friends.
'Cause my school now depends on a dead girl walking.

    So watch your back, I’m a dead girl walking.

    Skulls will crack, I’m a dead girl walking.

    It’s time to make amends and avenge my worthless friends.

    'Cause my school now depends on a dead girl walking.

    (Source: agoodrhyme)

     
  10. 10:33

    Notes: 38406

    Reblogged from jcchasezsdolphin

    Tags: exactly.musical appreciation

    maria-alice-121:

    WHAT DO WE WANT?

    PROFESSIONALLY FILMED STAGE MUSICALS!!

    WHERE DO WE WANT IT?

    ON NETFLIX!!

    (Source: jonathangriff)

     
  11. curlicuecal:

    5anddime:

    ermahgerdkerfer:

    Damn, this girl was prepared.

    She learned from experience. That look on her face is one who found out all of Jack-Jack’s powers through trial by fire.

    Kari McKeen, future S.H.I.E.L.D agent.

     
  12. celestial-sexhair:

    me as a celebrity

    (Source: hummelilde)

     
  13. Plays: 2,787

    golevkamusic:

    Is your heart filled with pain, shall i come back again?
    Tell me dear, are you lonesome tonight?

     
  14. flatsound:

    i wanna feel how dogs feel when you let them go in a big field 

     
  15. silvermoon424:

    Usagi’s relationship with Chibi Chibi is one of my favorite elements of Stars, if not the whole series.

    It’s a very refreshing change from her relationship with Chibiusa. Although Chibiusa and Usagi have a very strong, loving relationship, it’s still fraught with pretty jealousy and silly squabbles. Although they always work it out in the end, we only rarely see Usagi step up into the mature role, the protective role.

    Then along comes Chibi Chibi.

    Chibi Chibi’s first appearance is very similar to Chibiusa’s in a few ways. They’re both pink-haired little girls who quite literally fall from the sky and into Usagi’s life. They both brainwash Usagi’s family into accepting them and seem to have ulterior motives. But there are some notable differences. Usagi’s first meeting with Chibi Chibi is noticeably less hostile than her meeting with Chibiusa. Most notably, Chibi Chibi doesn’t pull a gun on her. :P 

    But aside from that, while Chibiusa lands on Usagi, steals a kiss from her boyfriend, and pulls a (fake) gun on her and threatens her, Chibi Chibi assumes the role of a lost child. They are introduced when Usagi catches the parasol Chibi Chibi was holding, an act that quickly endears the child to her, which leads Chibi Chibi to start following her around (when you rewatch this episode after finishing the series, it’s clear that Chibi Chibi was able to sense that Usagi is the strong, kind warrior she’s been sent to look for). Throughout the whole experience, Usagi is never angered, just confused and a bit concerned. 

    My point is that I feel as though their first meeting set the course of their future relationship. Usagi got off to a very rocky start with Chibiusa; her start with Chibi Chibi, while strange, was mostly okay.

    I think the ages of Chibi Chibi and Chibiusa (as well as their personalities) also play a huge role. Chibiusa, while clearly a child, is very mature and precocious. Although she can be rather bratty and childish at times, for the most part she acts much older than she appears. Chibi Chibi, on the other hand, is a very sweet, very cute little girl; she’s practically still a baby. She can barely talk (only saying “chibi chibi” and repeating the end of sentences) and clearly still needs someone to take care of her.

    I don’t feel like Usagi ever felt much of a need to be protective towards Chibiusa (except for in dangerous situations, that is… in that case, WATCH OUT if you’re the one threatening her baby). Chibiusa is pretty mature and has shown that she can oftentimes handle herself. On the other hand, when Usagi looks at Chibi Chibi, she sees a very young child who needs constant protection and love. Instead of her sisterly relationship with Chibiusa, Usagi basically becomes Chibi Chibi’s surrogate mother; protecting, loving, and caring for her. 

    As I mentioned above, I feel as though this is a very nice change and further serves to distinguish that Chibiusa and Chibi Chibi are very distinct and separate characters (which is why it seriously peeves me when people say that Chibi Chibi is just a replacement Chibiusa). Through her relationship with Chibi Chibi, we get to see Usagi’s maternal and mature side.